Tuesday, December 17, 2013

The Aura in Medicine

Electrophotography
"Orthodox medicine does not recognise the existence of the human aura; but a number of medical doctors have investigated this aspect of man. One of the first to do so was Dr Walter Kilner, head of the electro-therapy department at St Thomas's Hospital in London. He was familiar with the Theosophical literature pertaining to the aura and etheric double. In 1908 he began experimenting with dicyanin screens in order to make the human aura visible. The dye used in the screens had a definite effect upon the human eye, making it sensitive to radiations not normally registered, and through this method Kilner could see the auric field around his patients. In 1911 he published his findings in a book called The Human Atmosphere which came complete with diagrams and screens. Kilner claimed that the aura had distinct inner and outer components, and that they showed changes when disease was present. None of Kilner's Work showed any indication that he could see that chakras; perhaps he could visualize only the coarsest aspects of the aura through the screens. He was adamant that the phenomena observed were physical in nature and in no way occult. In recent years Dr John Pierrakos, director of the Institute for Bioenergentic Analysis in New York, has observed the aura directly without the use of screens. His findings bear a close resemblance to those of Kilner, and he too has attempted to apply these observations for diagnostic purposes in his own practice. Another outstanding physician, Dr. Shafica Karagulla, works with sensitivities, clairvoyants who can see the auric fields as well as the various bodies of man and the chakras. Their descriptions of the alterations taking place in the chakras and the subtle bodies have been found to have an accurate ad direct relationship to the actual physical diseases recorded in the patients-medical histories. In many instances the sensitivities can detect pathological changes in the aura before they make a physical appearance. No doubt the day will come when science will devise instrumentation that can scan the human aura and make visible these subtle energy fields. One of the earliest examples of electrophotography, showing the radiating lines of energy from a human hand, taken in the late nineteenth century. The energy lines radiating at right angles from the surfaces of the hand fit descriptions given by clairvoyants of the etheric body." An Excerpt from Subtle Body Essence and Shadow by David V. Tansley

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Natural Dyes from Flowers Plants and Roots

For ages nature has provided man with colour in his surroundings; and over the last 5,000 years or so man learned to transfer some of her colours to cloth, paper, wood, leather, soaps etc
The vegetable dye known to have been in use the longest is indigo. An indigo-dyed garment dating from about 3000 B.C. was found in the ancient Eygyptian city of Thebes. A process called mordanting-treating the material to be dyed with other substances that serve to fix the coulour-was discovered, probably in India, around 2,000 B.C.
General Information about Dyeing

First of all you will need:
  1. A scales to weigh the plants parts and the material to be dyed etc. A large postal scales or kitchen scales would be suitable.
  2. A stainless steel pot large enough to comfortably hold 4 to 5 gallons of liquid and materials to be dyed.
  3. Measuring cups for liquids.
  4. A cooking thermometer
  5. A stick or long handled wooden spoon for stirring.
  6. Plastic measuring spoons.
  7. Rain water.
  8. Large Buckets for rinsing.
Here are some suitable mordants, you can find these at the pharmacy or your local supermarket.
Acetic acid (vinegar would do)
Alum (potassium aluminum sulphate)
Ammonia
Blue vitrol
Caustic soda
Chrome
Copperas or green vitrol (ferrous sulfate)
Cream  of tartar, or potassium acid tartrate (potassium bitartrate)
Lime (calcium hydroxide)
Tannic acid
Tartaric acid
Tin (stannous chloride)

Raw animal fibers such as wool and silk have a greasy coating that must be removed through repeated washing with a mild soap and water. Vegetable fibers do not need washing. In mordanting the clean prepared material is simmered (wool) or boiled (cotton, linen) or soaked in hot water (silk) in which the mordants have been dissolved. After the prescribed time the material is removed, rinsed and allowed to dry. The dye bath is then prepared by soaking the chopped plant material in water overnight and then boiling until sufficiant colour is extracted. The plant material is then strained out and water added to make 4 to 4 1/2 gal. of lukewarm dye bath, to which a pound (dry weight) of wet yarn or fabric is added. Wool, cotton and linen are usually simmered in the dye bath; for silk the temperature must be kept at 160 F or less. After dyeing and stirring as long as nessesary to get the material dyed through one series of rinses, each a little cooler than the previous one, until the rinse water remains clear. After drying the dyed material is ready for use.

Typical mordanting instructions for one pound of wool (dry weight):

Heat 16 to 17 litres of soft water until it is lukewarm. Add 3oz/85g alum and 1oz/28g cream of tartar which have been first dissolved in a little hot water. Immerse wet (but not dripping wet) wool in the water; spread and stir to ensure even coverage. Heat gradually to boiling and then simmer for an hour turning the wool occasionally. When the bath is cool enough to let the wool be handled, remove the wool and squeeze (don't wring) out the excess liquid. Place loosely in a bag or towel and let dry slowly in a cool place.

Typical dyeing instructions for one pound/ 450g of wool (dry weight):

Crush or chop about 8 dry litres of leaves, soft stems or flowers, or soak about 1lb / 450g of hard materials such as bark or wood; soak overnight in enough soft water to cover. The next day, boil for 30 minutes to 2 hours, depending on how readily the colour is extracted. Strain out the plant matter and add water to make 16 to 17 liters of dye. After heating the dye bath to lukewarm, add the mordanted wool, which has first been wetted in lukewarm water. Move the wool back and forth and lift it in and boiling and simmer for 30 minutes or more. When the colour is right, rinse the wool in buckets of successively cooler water until the rinse water remains clear. Squeeze out and hang it up in a shady place to dry.



Untitled Document
List of Plant Dyes by Colour
BLACK

Barberry

Black alder

Blackthorn

Common plum

English oak

Flowering ash

Logwood

Meadowsweet

Valley oak

Yellow dock

BLUE

Bearberry

Cornflower

Dogs Mercury

Elecampane

Hollyhock

Indigo

Logwood

Meadowsweet

Mesquite

Pomegranite

Privet

Sweet potato

Woad

BROWN

Alder buckthorn

Bird's tongue

Black alder

Black birch

Black gum

Black oak

Blackthorn

Black walnut

Canoe birch

Cascara sagrada

Catechu

Cotton

Dyer's camomile

English walnut

Ginko

Heather

Hemlock spruce

Iceland moss

Indigo bush

Juniper

Larch

Logwood

Lombardy poplar

Osage-orange

Pomegranite

Rooibos

Rose of China

Sumac

Sweet potato

Turmeric

White oak

GOLD

Black oak

Dyer's camomile

Fistic

Goldenrod

Lily of the valley

Osage-orange

Privet

Smartweed

Turmeric

GRAY

Bearberry

Black alder

Blackberry

Bracken

Butternut
GREY (Cont)

Logwood

Red maple

Rhododendron

Rose of China

Rowan

St Johnswort

Shave grass

Sumac

Wax myrtle

GREEN

Bearberry

Beard's tongue

Black alder

Black oak

Bracken

Canoe birch

Coltsfoot

Dog's mercury

Dyer's broom

Fumitory

Heather

Lady's mantle

Larkspur

Lily of the valley

Lombardy poplar

Meadowsweet

Motherwort

Nettle

Onion

Red maple

Rose of China

Scotch broom

Shave grass

Tansy

Wax myrtle

White birch

ORANGE

Annatto

Black oak

Bloodroot

Calliopsis

Henna

Onion

Sumac

PURPLE

Black alder

Dandelion

Heather

Pomegranite

Rose of China

Tall field buttercup

Yellow bedstraw

RED

Alkanet

Alpine cranberry

American ivy

Annatto

Barberry

Black birch

Blackthorn

Bloodroot

Calliopsis

Dandelion

Dye bedstraw

Henna

Madder

Poinsetta

Pokeweed

Red alder

Rue

Safflower
RED (Cont)

White birch

Wild marjoram

Yellow bedstraw

TAN

Apple

Butternut

Fustic

Goldenrod

Osage-orange

Sumac

Tea

YELLOW

Almond

Alpine cranberry

Apple

Barberry

Bearberry

Beard grass

Big-bud hickory

Black alder

Black elder

Black oak

Bracken

Broad-leaved dock

Calliopsis

Chinese arborvitae

Coltsfoot

Cotton

Dog's mercury

Dyer's broom

Dyer's camomile

European ragwort

Flowering ash

Fumitory

Fustic

Goldenrod

Hackberry

Heather

Indigo bush

Jewelweed

Lily of the valley

Lombardy poplar

Marigold

Meadowseet

Nettle

Osage-organe

Pomegranite

Privet

Red maple

Rooibos

Rose of China

Safflower

Saffron

St Johnswort

Sassafras

Scatchbroom

Shave grass

Smartweed

Sorrel

Stickleweed

Sorrel

Sticklewort

Sumac

Sundew

Sunflower

Sweet potato

Tansy

Turmeric

Virgin's bower

Weld

White birch

White mulberry

Wild crab apple

Yellow bedstraw

Yellow root


Ref: The Herb Book by John Lust
Stockists of herbs and plant materials

Friday, October 18, 2013

Healthy Bread Recipes


Making your own bread is very rewarding. On a cold day it's comforting to have the oven on for warming the kitchen and almost nothing beats the smell of freshly baked scones. Here are some tips before you start. 

Yeast bread tips: make sure you don't use too hot water or milk as it will kill the yeast, have it as hot as feels comfortable when you put your hand in there. Make sure you knead the dough well. Time yourself to be sure because ten minutes kneading feels like a long time and most times we under-knead. You can't knead too much when it comes to yeast bread. Don't leave out the salt. Have your oven hot. Don't over rise your bread or it will sink when you put it in the oven. If you over rise it just knock it back and reshape, let it rise again and then bake. Use stoneground flour for yeast breast. Coursely ground wholewheat flour will make very heavy bread if you are using yeast unless you use 50/50 wholewheat and white.

Soda bread tips: this is the opposite to yeast bread, handle the dough as little as possible. Just enough to make sure everything is evenly distributed and then stop. Have the mix rather too soft than too firm. Only use a light dusting of flour to stop it sticking. Don't leave it sitting around waiting to go into the oven. Have your oven hot when you put the bread in there. 


Wholewheat Herb Scones

1 Cup of wholewheat flour or whole spelt flour
1/2 cup of good white flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon raw sugar
2 oz (60 g.) butter
1 teaspoon mixed herbs (your choice)
5 tablespoons natural yogurt

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees centigrade Put the dry ingredients into a bowl and lift the dry mix with your hands a few times to get some air in there, this will help to make the scones light. Rub in the butter. Add the herbs and then the yogurt and mix until a soft dough is formed, add a little more yogurt if the dough is too firm and sprinkle with a little flour if it's too sticky. Do this fast and don't handle the dough too much as this will make your scones tough. Roll out gently onto floured surface and use an upturned glass or scone cutter to cut out rounds. Place them on a floured or oiled tray and bake for about 25 minutes. Serve warm

Basic Wholewheat Bread

1 and 1/2 lb. (700 g.) wholewheat flour or whole spelt flour.
1 tablespoon sea salt
1/2 cup of good honey
1/2 cup of good vegetable oil
3/4 pint (4.5 dl.) warm water
1/2 oz. (15 g.) fresh yeast or 2 teaspoons dried yeast

Mix the flour, salt and oil in a large bowl; in a separate bowl put the honey, pour over the warm water and blend in the yeast. (if dried yeast is used, leave for 15 minutes to activate.) Make a well in the flour and pour in the yeast and honey mixture Blend until a firm dough is formed. Knead on a floured surface for at least 10 minutes. Form a ball with the dough, place in a covered greased bowl and leave in a warm place to rise for about an hour - the dough should be double in size. Knead for another 2-3 minutes; shape into a loaf and put into a greased 2 lb. (1 kg.) loaf tin; cover and leave in a warm draft free place until it has reached the top of the tin. Bake in a hot oven 230 degrees centigrade for 10 minutes, then lower the heat to 200 and bake for a further 20-25 minutes, or until cooked through. To test empty the bread out of the tin and tap the bottom of the loaf. It should sound hollow.

Country Loaf

1 lb. (450 g.) wholewheat flour or whole spelt four
1/4 lb. (125 g.) rye flour
1/4 lb. (125 g.) cornmeal
1 tablespoon sea salt
1 cup of raw milk or milk alternative
3 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons molasses
1/2 oz. (15 g.) fresh yeast or 2 teaspoons dried yeast

Mix the flours together with the salt; in a saucepan combine the wet ingredients and cook over a low heat until the molasses has dissolved and is well blended. Put the yeast in a bowl and slowly add the warm but not hot milk and molasses, stirring thoroughly. Pour the yeast mixture into the flours. Blend until a firm dough is formed. Knead on a floured surface for 10 minutes; put the dough in a covered bowl and allow to rise until it has doubled in size. Knead for a few more minutes; make into two oval loaves and put on a greased baking sheet; make a couple of knife slits on the top; leave to rise again until about double in size; bake for 35 minutes at 200 degrees centigrade.



Thursday, October 3, 2013

Nature Casts Her Radiance

ONE of the most interesting and vital substances in the world is "the green colouring matter of plants" known as chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is closely related, chemically, to hemoglobin, "the red colouring matter of the blood". The basic difference between the two, in fact, is simply that whereas the molecule constituting the hemoglobin of blood contains, in addition to carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, the element iron, in the chlorophyll molecule magnesium is substituted for iron.
Blood, of course, is also related to chlorophyll in function. Chlorophyll is the vital element in the "blood" of the plant, of plant life, serving the same purposes in the plants economy that hemoglobin does in higher forms of life.

How is Chlorophyll made?
"A ray of sunlight strikes the green leaf, and instantly the miracle is wrought. Within the plant molecule of water and carbon dioxide are torn apart-a feat which the chemist can accomplish only with great difficulty and expense. First there are only lifeless gas and water; then, presto! these elements are transformed into living tissue and useful energy. Oxygen is released from the plant to revitalize the air we breathe. Units of energy, in sugars and other carbohydrates, are speedily manufactured and stored within the living plant. Out of the process stems much of what we know as life and growth. Man consumes the energy as food-both in vegetables and the flesh of herbivorous animals. He uses it in the form of coal, oil and gas-green vegetables locked up in the earth for ages."

The above excerpt is from one of the earliest reports on the miracle of chlorophyll. As the writer pointed out at the time: "Don't be surprised if your doctor tells you that he has never heard of chlorophyll being used in this way (medicinally). But evidence of chlorophyll's medicinal value is most encouraging so far. Distinguished medical specialists report that in 1200 recorded cases they have seen chlorophyll combat deep-lying infections, and banish common head colds.. More remarkable, they say, is the way it accomplishes these things-speedily and effectively, with none of the harsh, irritating effects common to most antiseptics. Chlorophyll, the healer, is at once powerful and bland-devastating to germs and yet gentle to the wounded body tissues. Exactly how it works is still Nature's secret. To the ordinary person the phenomenon seems like green magic.
Chlorophyll, according to another scientist, is associated with the various oil-soluble vitamin complexes, with vitamins A, E, F and K. (Vitamin F is more generally referred to as UFA, the principle of the unsaturated fatty acids proved so essential to health, and with the enzyme phosphatase.)

Antiseptic Effects
The conditions which have been reported as responding favourably to the administration of chlorophyll include both internal and external infections; simple and infected wounds and ulcerations; various skin and bone diseases, peritonitis (inflammation of the membrane lining the stomach cavity, the viscera), mouth, gum and sinus infections. Chlorophyll has also been used therapeutically to reduce hypertension, or high blood pressure.
Chlorophyll's antiseptic effect, in addition to its property of strengthening the walls of cells, may also be due in part to its other beneficial effects; importantly chlorophyll's ability to neutralize the metabolic toxin, guanidine, which could be "the main toxic agent in severe burns. Chlorophyll acts much quicker than vitamin F in treating burns. It nullifies the pain; the quicker it is applied after the burn the less severity, for the toxic agents are destroyed before they do much damage. Chlorophyll applied to extracted tooth sockets stops the same type of pain-the agonizing, irritating pain that keeps the patient awake, that is so hard to alleviate with narcotics."

Nutritional and Healing Properties
Commenting on the nutritional qualities of chlorophyll Dr. Royal Lee observes: "Another effect attributed to guanidine is the precipitation of calcium from blood serum, and it is suspected to be a cause of calcification of coronary arteries, diffusing in from the muscle-guanidine being an end product of muscle fatigue. We may consider that this chlorophyll complex is of much greater importance than heretofore suspected and that its use by races such as the Chinese, where arthritis and heart disease is practically unknown, may be a very important factor in contributing to the prevention of these diseases so prevalent in this country, where greens, if eaten at all, are generally cooked and of questionable quality in the first place."
In a dramatic series of experiments, made to determine the relative efficiency of various chlorophyll preparations as healing agents, in comparison with a large number of other substances widely used for the purpose, the chlorophyll preparations proved more effective than any of the other-by a wide margin.
"In summary, we note that 67 percent of all wounds treated by one or another preparation of chlorophyll healed more rapidly than their controls...it would seem to indicate that chlorophyll does not cause some biologic response in respect to stimulating cell growth which can be put to a useful purpose in the many problems associated with would healing...Of all these agents, only the chlorophyll preparations consistently showed any statistically significant effect in accelerating the healing of both traumatic and thermal (heat-caused) wounds."

Natures Miracle Medicine
Of probability the most vital importance in its significance in the above experiments is the fact that chlorophyll increases the body's intake of oxygen, as the result of which the disposal of the metabolic toxin, carbonic acid, is facilitated with increased efficiency-up to twenty percent more rapidly. 
Chlorophyll, much to the bafflement of early investigators, is inert in the test tube; that is, it has no antiseptic effects in the test-tube. It was not until it was realized that it operates in the above manner that the physiology of its activity was understood. Its clinical effects are largely explained by this phenomenon.
Perhaps the best indication of the tremendous potentialities of this substance, chlorophyll, "the green miracle," is offered in an experiment that took place not long ago.

In this investigation into its oxygenating properties a man was sealed-literally sealed-into an airtight tank, for a matter of no less than 57 hours. As we know, normally this would mean suicide, within minutes. But the man emerged from his air-tight chamber no worse for the experience.
The secret? Chlorophyll. The tank contained a series of tubes containing algae. Under the influence of batteries of lamps-what might be termed synthetic sunlight-the algae were activated in the process called photosynthesis, in which the single-celled plants-initiated nutrients essential to their existence, and of course, used in turn by higher life forms of life for their existence. The man breathed in the released oxygen and breathed out the metabolic waste product, carbon dioxide, the carbon and oxygen of which then become available to the plants, permitting them to product carbon-containing molecules-a fair exchange between plants and man that provide the vital essentials for both.

In Summary
Chlorophyll, in common with miracle-working vitamin C, is another example of the natural superiority of the contents of nature's wonderful medicine chest over man-synthesized products, i.e., safe, harmless, physiologically compatible, free of "side effects" -incomparably better, more effective.
It certainly appears that in our obsession with the rapid development of our chemistry in our laboratories we have tended to largely overlook the value of the products of the laboratory that was here long before our own laboratories. On the other hand, it must of course be realized that, paradoxically enough, in order to be in a position to learn the true extent of nature's gifts it was necessary for us to learn, through laboratory techniques, their nature. Chlorophyll is an outstanding example of this fact.
Excerpt from NATURE"S MIRACLE MEDICINE CHEST by C. EDWARD BURTIS



Friday, August 9, 2013

PRESERVES

In Ireland it's the time of year when we start to think about ways of storing natures harvest for times when fruit and fresh herbs are not as plentiful.  

Here are some wonderful recipes adapted from a book called Vogue Natural Health & Beauty by Bronwen Meredith.

Apple Chutney
15 g.  mustard seed
15 apples
600 ml. cider vinegar
250 g. brown sugar
60 g. raisins
1 garlic clove 
60 g. onions
1 tablespoon dried chillies
45 g. powdered ginger
30 g. salt

Wash the mustard seed in some extra vinegar and put in the sun or cool oven to dry. Peel, core and slice the apples and boil them with the vinegar and sugar until soft. Chop the raisins. Cut the garlic and onions into small pieces and grind them in a mortar, adding the ginger and mustard seeds. Add all the ingredients to the cooked apples, mix well and bottle when cold.


Candied Angelica
2 cups angelica roots and stalks
2 cups boiling water
1/4 cup sea salt
1 very green cabbage
1 cup water mixed with 1 cup cider vinegar
2 cups sugar
2 cups water

Put the washed angelica in a saucepan and cover with boiling water and sea-salt; steep for 12 hours. Drain, peel and rinse in cold water. Put a layer of cabbage leaves in a clean pan, then another layer of angelica, then another of leaves, and so on, finishing with a layer of leaves on the top. Cover with the water-and-vinegar mixture. Boil slowly until the angelica becomes green; strain. Make a syrup from the sugar and 2 cups of water; add the angelica and cook for 20 minutes; pour off and reserve the syrup. Put the angelica on a wire rack to cool for 2 days. Then once more boil together the syrup and angelica until the stalks and roots are candied. Dry on a rack until completely dry.

Carrot Jam
2 kg. carrots
1 kg. sugar
4 lemons
180 g. butter

Wash and grate the carrots, boil until reduced to a pulp, using as little water as possible. To every 1/2 kg pulp add 250 g. sugar. the juice and grated peel of 2 lemons and 90 g. butter. Boil for one hour.


Spiced Whole Grapes
1 kg. seedless white grapes
1/2 kg. raw sugar
1.5 l. cider vinegar
2 teaspoons mustard seed
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon allspice
2 bay leaves
30 g. powdered fruit pectin

Wash the grapes; put the sugar and vinegar in a pan with all the herbs and spices, bring to the boil and simmer gently for 15 minutes, stirring from time to time. Remove the bay leaves. Add the grapes and pectin, bring to the boil again and simmer for 5 minutes, skimming away any scum. Remove from the heat, allow to stand for 15 minutes, stirring to avoid a skin setting on the top and bottle. Use within 4 weeks.


Indian Mint Chutney
1 cooking apple
1 small onion
4 tablespoons brown sugar
125 g. fresh mint leaves
salt and cayenne pepper

Chop the apple into small pieces, put into the blender with all the other ingredients and blend until a thick paste is formed. Chill in the refrigerator in covered jars. It is good with lamb and grilled fish.


Elderberry Ketchup
1 kg. elderberries
600 ml. cider vinegar
30 g. shallots or white onions
45 g. whole ginger
1 bay leaf
15 g. peppercorns

Wash the berries and put in an unglazed or Pyrex casserole; boil the vinegar, pour over the berries and cook for 8 hours in a very cool oven. Strain, put into a pan with the onions or shallots, minced or cut very finely, peeled ginger, bay leaf and peppercorns. Boil for 10 minutes and allow to cool; remove the bay leaf; bottle.




Parsley Jelly
50 sprigs parsley
peel of 1 lemon
juice of 2 lemons
2 cups sugar

Wash the parsley and place in a saucepan with just enough water just to cover, add the lemon peel and boil for about 1 hour. Strain; add the lemon juice to the liquid. Allowing a cup of sugar to a cup of the liquid, boil until it begins to set. Bottle and keep in a cool place. To be served with chicken or fish dishes. 
Marjoram jelly can be made in the same way and served with any main course dish, or as a spread for toast and bread.


Elderberry Chutney
1 kg. elderberries
1 large onion
2 tablespoons chopped onion
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon mixed spices and cayenne
1 teaspoon ground mustard seed
600 ml. cider vinegar

Wash the berries well, put in a heavy pan and crush a little with a wooden spoon; add the chopped onion and all other ingredients. Slowly bring to the boil and simmer until it begins to thicken, stirring constantly all the time. Allow to cool before bottling.


Orange Marmalade with Coriander
4 oranges
2 lemons
6 cups water
1 tablespoon crushed coriander
2 kg. sugar

Keep the skin on the fruit, wash well and cut into slices; soak overnight in the water. Put the coriander seeds in a muslin bag, securely tied, and place in the pan with the fruit and water, bring to the boil and simmer until the peel is soft; add the sugar and boil until the liquid sets. The coriander gives the marmalade a very special spicy taste.



Rose Petal Honey
250 g. whole roses (red or pink)
900 ml. boiling water
1.25 kg. liquid honey 
juice and pips of 2 lemons

Select the scented opened petals of red and pink roses and cut off the white bases. Rinse well in cool water in a sieve; put in a bowl and pour over the boiling water; cover and leave standing for 6 hours. Strain - the liquid should be perfumed and pink. Pour the honey into a preserving pan, add the rose water, the lemon juice and the pips in a muslin bag. Bring to the boil, simmer for 30 minutes or until it sets; cool a little before pouring into jars.


Rose Hip Jelly
1 kg. rose hips
approximately 1 kg. sugar 
2 or 3 lemons

The rose hips should be gathered before they go too soft; cut in half, put into a saucepan with enough water to cover; simmer gently until the hips are soft - usually under an hour. Strain and return to the pan allowing 1/2 kg. sugar and the juice of 1 lemon to every 600 ml. of the liquid. Simmer until the jelly sets. This jelly is good with poultry, game or fish dishes, and can also be used on bread.


Mint and Apple Jelly
3 kg. apples
1 lemon
1.5 kg. sugar
30 sprigs of mint

Prepare and slice the apples and place in a heavy pan with the juice and grated peel of the lemon; cover well with water and boil to a pulp. Put in a muslin bag and allow to drip for several hours (overnight is practical). Return the strained liquid to the pan, allowing 1/2 kg. of sugar to every 600 ml. of the juice; add the mint leaves and boil for 45 minutes; strain to remove all particles of mint and return to the heat for a few minutes until set. This should be a delicate shade of green.


Spiced Apples
2 kg. apples
1 l. cider vinegar
2 kg. sugar
30 g. cinnamon sticks
15 g. cloves

Peel and slice the apples; in a pan boil together the vinegar, sugar and spices; simmer for 15 minutes, add the apples and cook until tender; take out the apples and put into jars; return the syrup to the heat and boil down until fairly thick; remove the spices; pour the syrup over the bottled apples.


Apple, Pear and Plum Jam
4 kg. apples
4 kg. pears
4 kg. plums
juice of 1 lemon 
3 l. cider
powdered cloves

Leave on the skins of all the fruits, cut into quarters and put into a heavy pan; add enough water to cover the base of the pan but not the fruit; bring to the boil and simmer until soft. Strain; return the juice to the pan, add the lemon juice, cider and cloves; boil quickly until thick enough to set.





Wednesday, July 31, 2013

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS

An extract from Vogue Natural Health & Beauty Book by Bronwen Meredith 1979 


Vegetables and fruits are the most accessible and certainly the simplest form of natural medicine. They are best eaten raw and are also effective when taken as a juice, Juices are, of course, easier to consume, and at times the only way to benefit therapeutically. For instance, it would be impossible for most people to eat sufficient raw cabbage to obtain the required amount for treatment of a gastric ulcer, whereas a pint or two of liquid is easily swallowed. An electric juice extractor is one of the best health investments. The regular addition to a basic diet of the following vegetables and fruits can strengthen the body and assist in prevention of metabolic breakdowns. Freshness is of paramount importance; vegetables and fruit begin to deteriorate as soon as they are gathered, though if eaten reasonably fresh the loss in values is slight. Cooking considerable reduces their power and that is why the raw vegetable or juice is always recommended for medical use. For general nutrition, cooking within certain principles is beneficial for body maintenance.
 It is important to remember that natural aids do their job very slowly. Larger amounts do not necessarily mean faster results; regular controlled doses are more effective. It is impossible to eat too much of the whole vegetable or fruit: satiation point would come first. The rule on juices is from 1 to 8 pints (6dl to 4.5l) a day, but never more than is comfortable.
 External applications-such as poultices or lotions-not only help surface conditions but often have the capacity to help infuse skin layers and influence internal organs. A poultice of cooked pulp will help aches and pains, slow-healing wounds and inflammation of the eyelids. A poultice of raw grated apple will help the pain of a black eye.

APPLE

Traditionally the great health provider, both preventative and curative, it is particularly high in mineral salts (a larger quantity of phosphates than any other vegetable or fruit) and rich in vitamins, and in addition provides first thing in the morning or last thing at night (they also encourage sleep). They help overcome liverishness, digestive disturbances and encourage flushing of the kidneys. Apple juice is good as a drink; on a curative basis take a minimum of a pint (6dl) a day. (Diabetic sweet cider can be taken as an alternative.) Cider vinegar also retains health giving properties - 2 teaspoons in a glass of water once or twice a day. Apples are prescribed for intestinal infections, mental and physical fatigue, demineralization, urine retention, rheumatism and gout; they are also recommended for coughs, hoarseness and pulmonary conditions. Some doctors advise apples to combat excess cholesterol in the blood. Eat two apples a day to help prevent myocardial infarct, 2lb. (a kilo) or more as a treatment.
Another alternative to the fresh juice is : 3 large unpeeled apples sliced and covered with 2 pints (1l) cold water, add 2 tablespoons honey and boil for 15 minutes, strain, drink tepid. If taken to alleviate a fever, drink cold.

ARTICHOKE (Globe)

This contains therapeutically valuable oils which have a strong stabilizing effect on the human metabolism. It is particularly beneficial for the liver and acts as a diuretic for those suffering from water retention. It can protect against urea, cholesterol and arthritis. The juice can be pressed from the stem and leaves, but it is very bitter. To relieve rheumatism take 2-3 teaspoons beofre meals - the taste can be improved if mixed with a small glass of wine.

BEETROOT

The amino acids are good both in quality and quantity and naturopathic practitioners consider the juice to be one of the most therapeutic. It is effective in cases of general weakness and is used as a restorative during convalescence. The root contains about one tenth pure sugar, which provides energy. In France, interesting results have been obtained by treating malignant disease with huge quantities of the juice, 6-7 pints (3.5-4l) a day; however, there is not yet enough medical evidence to substantiate findings. Beetroot juice combined with carrot and cucumber juices builds up the blood and is helpful in the treatment of kidney stones, gall bladder, liver and prostrate troubles.

BLACKBERRY

The fruit is rich in mineral salts and is therefore used for anaemia; it is also an astringent, tonic and restorative for the mucus membranes. Blackberry syrup - hot water, honey and blackberries - is good for sore throats, hoarseness and trouble with the upper respiratory tract. Tincture of blackberry is recommended as a gastric tonic: 1 cup of blackberries, covered with 2 pints (1l) of alcohol; leave to macerate in the sun or in a warm place for 3 weeks, stirring occasionally; filter and add honey if necessary; take one sherry glass each day.

CABBAGE

One of the most versatile vegetables - and, surprisingly, most of its effectiveness is through external applications. Chopped cabbage leaves, preferably the greenest, places between pieces of hot muslin can be used as a compress to relive liver attacks, intestinal pains, migraines, sprains, rheumatic pains, lumbago, neuralgia, varicose veins, eczema, burns and wounds. Poultices should be applied morning and evening to the afflicted area. In the case of a burn or insect bite, a crushed cabbage leaf will reduce the pain and facilitate healing. It will help to heal cuts, sores, pimples, skin outbreaks, such as boils and abscesses, superficial infections and swellings. To heal blisters, cook the leaves in milk and apply when cool. As a juice, it is valuable for cirrhosis of the liver, especially when caused by alcoholism, and as a preventative against arthritis and gout. It has also been shown to be successful with gastric ulcers, easing pain quickly and speeding up the healing process; here regular doses are recommended (up to a total of 18 fluid oz. - 5 dl. - a day) as excessive intake can cause complications. For bronchial infections, coughing and hoarseness, take 1-2 wineglasses of cabbage juice a day with the addition of honey; or as much of the following concentrate as liked: boil six large leaves in 2 pints of water (1 l.) of water for 30 minutes, sweeten with honey. For a soothing nightcap, try cabbage leaves with a few leaves of sage brewed as a tea; it is also good as a gargle for sore throats.

CARROT

It is now generally acknowledged that carrots increase the number of red blood corpuscles and consequently are one of the best aids for the liver. At Vichy, where they specialize in disorders of the liver, carrots in one form or another are part of every menu. Pure carrot soup is regarded as a worthwhile treatment for a stomach ulcer, and can help constipation too - liquidised. The high vitamin A content is responsible for many of the good results. It is no myth that it helps eye strain, not only aiding night - sight but also acting as a restorer for eyes strained by bright lights (Vitamin A is destroyed by harsh lighting). As a basic health measure, drink a minimum of 1 wineglass of carrot juice daily, preferably first thing every morning. It protects against colds, flu and bronchitis. Poultices of freshly grated carrots help relieve pain from burns and prevent the formation of blisters. It is important not to scrape carrots for the skin contains a large percentage of the active ingredients; wash and brush only.

CELERY

Celery is a good source of chlorides, potassium and sodium, but it is the essential oils that put celery on the therapeutic level and have a specific effect on the nervous system. Celery has strong diuretic powers, which means it is useful during any slimming regime, and helps control arthritis, gout and rheumatism. A wineglass of celery juice sweetened with a tablespoon of honey will reduce the appetite when taken before meals. Eaten raw at the end of a meal, it acts as a digestive, and has the reputation of being a natural antacid. As a poultice - grated raw and combined with linseed - it helps swollen glands.

CUCUMBER

Gets rid of excess fluid and any toxic matter in the body. It is therefore of prime interest to dieters (a minimum of 3 wineglasses of juice a day). Combined with carrot and celery juice, it is good for all rheumatic conditions. It is however, mainly used as an external application to aid the skin.

FIG

Mainly used dried, the fig helps constipation, relieves chest complaints and is a remedy for colds and throat conditions. Its use as a laxative is well known; the seeds stimulate the bowels into action. Soak 6 dried figs in tepid water, leave over night and eat first thing in the morning; also drink the water. A decoction of figs can be taken for pulmonary infections, used as a gargle for throat irritation and as a mouth wash for gum disorders such as abscess or gingivitis. Boil 6 figs in 2 pints (1 l.) water or milk for five minutes, strain. Externally, a poultice of fresh figs or dried or dried figs cooked in milk can soothe burns and draw abscesses and boils to a head. To help chilblains and haemorrhoid's, roast figs in the oven, pulverize and mix with honey; use lightly.


GARLIC

This plant has become synonymous with health, energy and longevity. It has two outstanding medical properties; it helps open blood vessels, thus aiding many maladies connected with circulation, and it is a strong antibiotic. For centuries it has been common remedy for colds, coughs, bronchitis and sore throats as it is by drinking milk in which you have boiled cloves of garlic. For arthritis, rheumatism, sciatica and sinus infections, mash 2 garlic cloves with a teaspoon of honey and take for three or four nights in succession. Garlic browned in butter and honey helps kidney and bladder troubles. Infused in milk or water. It is recommended for reducing blood pressure and relieving headaches. Animal studies have shown improvement in arteriosclerosis conditions; Italians (who eat garlic with almost everything) have a lower incidence of heart disease than most Europeans. Garlic also brings relief in cases of indigestion, intestinal infections and liver disorders. It has  long been recognized as one of the best natural remedies for getting rid of worms because of the high allicin content of the oil.
Here is a good garlic tonic: mince 2 garlic cloves and steep in a glass of white wine for 3 days; take a teaspoon first thing every morning. Or steep chopped garlic in alcohol in the ration of one part garlic to two of alcohol. Allow to stand in the warmth (sunlight or near a stove) for 2 weeks; strain. Begin by taking 2 drops in a glass of warm water before lunch or dinner (once a day only) and each successive day increase the dose by one drop until a maximum of 25 is reached; then reverse the procedures, returning drop by drop to 1. This tonic can be taken several times a year, but allow an interval of six weeks between treatments.
An ointment can be made by crushing 2 cloves of garlic and blending it in 2 tablespoons of lard. This can be rubbed or massaged into area of rheumatic pain or neuritis; it has a powerful effect on healing wounds and was much in demand during the first world war. It can also be applied to insect bites - mash a clove, or extract the juice, and mix with small amounts of hot water or honey.

HORSE-RADISH

One of the more potent diuretics, with a stimulating effect on the blood capillaries and so useful in the treatment of kidney conditions: chop 1 oz. (20 g.) of fresh horse-radish root, add half ounce (15 g.) bruised mustard seed and a pint (6 dl.) of boiling water; cover and steep for 5 hours; strain and take 3 tablespoons a day. Horse-radish can be added to other vegetable juices to stimulate digestion and help urine pass through weak kidneys. It can be also mixed with white wine or made into a sauce by shredding and mashing the root and adding lemon juice. A very good solvent for mucus in the nose and sinus: take a half a teaspoon of horse-radish sauce morning and early evening. Do not drink or eat anything for 15 minutes afterwards - there is a feeling of clearance in the head, the eyes may stream and sometimes there is sweating. Small doses only; large amounts could damage the lining of the stomach and the intestines. It may take some time to clear the passages, even months for a severe case. A syrup made of horse radish, honey and water can be taken for hoarseness. Externally, a compress made with grated horse-radish mixed with a little water produces heat and relieves rheumatic pains, neuralgia and stiffness.


LEMON

Probably the most valuable of all fruits for preserving health. Because of its high vitamin C content it has been used for hundreds of years as a protection against scurvy. It can neutralize harmful and infectious bacteria, which is why in many hot climates the juice of a lemon is a last minute addition to meat, fish and vegetable dishes. On raw oysters it destroys 90 per cent of the bacteria within 15 minutes. Lemon juice is used in all kinds of infections of the respiratory tact and as a general toni - the juice should be diluted with water, sweetened with honey if desired; there is no need to worry about when temperatures are high it is advisable to take regular drinks to prevent dehydration. It is a cure for stubborn hiccoughs and helpful in jaundice - recent research indicates that lemon juice aids regeneration of the liver, balancing the harmful effects of alcohol. Those who wish to lose weight or to avoid putting on weight should drink it first thing in the morning diluted with hot or cold water or mineral water. It is a good astringent and may be used as a gargle for a sore throat, in uterine hemorrhage after delivery or as a sunburn lotion.

LETTUCE

Its rich mineral content, including iodine, phosphorous, iron, copper, cobalt, zinc, calcium, manganese and potassium, make it one of the best restorers of the body's mineral balance. The outer leaves are the most beneficial. It is good for the nervous system as it has calming effect. It is also prescribed for gastric spasms and palpitations and can be used as a sedative; a small lettuce, simmered in 1 pint (6 dl.) of water for 15 minutes, makes a helpful night drink for insomniacs.

ONION

The oils that give the onion its pungency are therapeutic agents which have an excellent germicidal effect, internal and external. The onion has much the same powers as garlic, but to a lesser degree; little of its value is lost in cooking. It has a normalizing influence on the nervous system and stimulates the growth of beneficial bacteria in the intestines. It aids digestion and secretion of bile; it also can lower blood pressure. It is a standard remedy against colds and catarrh, as well as being a good general tonic: to 5 oz. (150 g.) grated onion mixed with 3 and half oz. (100 g.) honey, add 2 pints (1 l.) white wine; cover and steep for 2 weeks, strain; take 4 teaspoons a day. A raw onion is recommended for rheumatism. Externally the raw juice can relieve painful joints; poultices of raw mashed onion help draw out foreign matter from infected areas; a slice of fresh onion rubbed on the infected area daily can clear up an abscess, because the onion has the power to absorb poisons. (Never eat or cook decayed onions - they are contaminated.)

PAPAYA

Also known as paw-paw. This is extremely rich in the enzymes that make the digestion of protein possible. An infusion of the fruit and leaves will make the toughest meat tender, a fact that illustrates its digestive value. Combined with cucumber juice it is an efficient general cleanser; during a 12 hour period, take, once every hour, a quarter pint (1.5 dl.) papaya juice and a quarter pint (1.5 dl.) cucumber juice alternately. Eaten regularly, the papaya can be helpful in the prevention of kidney stones. Mixed with a boiled egg yolk it can help cirrhosis of the liver. With honey it is good for urinary disorders and is a tonic for the heart, liver and blood. The skin is used as a special external treatment for wounds and infections that fail to heal properly or quickly. It has been claimed that papaya has rejuvenating properties, especially with regards to stalling premature aging - this may be due to is ability to keep the digestive system in peak condition.


STRAWBERRY

Because of its very high iron content it is used in the treatment of anemia. It also helps to lower blood pressure. The rich supply of salicylic acid aids the functions of the liver, kidneys and joints, and it is a good detoxifying agent.

An extract from Vogue Natural health & Beauty Book by Bronwen Meredith 1979 

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Summer Time & Herbal Teas

I love herbal teas, not the commercial tea bag type herbal tea, which all taste the same, I mean the real deal, the type of herbal tea that sparkles with flavour, health benefits and balance.

There are so many to choose from it would be difficult to pick a favourite, so how about I give you three of my favourite herbal teas for the summer.

LIME FLOWER~ (or Linden Flower)

Part used as a tea: Flowers and bracts (small leaves growing alongside the flower)

How to make it: Use 1 heaped teaspoonful to a cup, and allow to brew for at least 5 minutes. Lime flowers can be made in an open cup as a pleasant drink, though if you want to take advantage of its medicinal virtues make it in a closed container.

How much to use: It is a very safe herb and can be drunk by young and old alike. Drink up to a maximum of 5 cups a day.

Flavour and taste: Lime flower tea has one of the pleasantest aromas of all - bringing a scent of summer in to your room. Its taste is delicious, and it combines well with a little added peppermint.

Health Benefits: Having such a wide variety of uses Lime flower tea is one of the most valuable herbal infusions. It is a good 'cold', 'flu and fever' herb, helping to raise a good sweat, clear out toxins, and lower the temperature. Take plenty of the tea as soon as you feel the telltale signs of a viral infection, or combine it with elderflower to make a very effective herbal 'flu' mix.
Lime flower tea is specific for headaches, whether due to viral infection, or to tension and anxiety, and it seems to have a predilection for problems affecting the head, as it helps also in sinus congestion and earache. It is soothing and calming and can bring significant relief in panic attacks, and in stress related disorders such as palpitations.
Lime flower tea is also excellent for the circulatory and blood pressure helping the tone of the arteries and to lower blood pressure levels. Taken long term it can help in the treatment of arteriosclerosis, as it contains large amounts of natural chemicals called bioflavinoids, which improve the health of the lining of the arteries.

History and Folklore: Lime flower honey is considered one of the finest flavoured honeys in the worls.
A harsh classical Greek myth recounts how Philyra, a nymph, was mounted by Saturn in the guise of a horse and eventually gave birth to a centaur - Cheiron. So mortified was she by what happened that she begged the gods not to leave her amongst the mortals. The gods approved and transformed her into a noble tree - the Lime tree.

LEMON BALM

Part used as tea: Leaves

How to make it: Lemon Balm is best made with fresh leaves picked straight from the garden, but if these are not available dried leaves that have been carefully stored in an airtight container will be fine. Use a small handful of fresh leaves, or a heaped teaspoonful of dried herbs, per cup. Always make in a teapot as the flavour and health benefits of the plant lie mainly in the essential oil, and this will literally float away if the tea is made in the open air!

How much to use: Take up to 3 or 4 cups a day as wanted. In the short term, one can take a little more, to help relieve anxiety and worry.

Flavour and taste: Lemon Balm as its name implies has a delightful aroma and subtle lemon flavoured taste. It is one of the most pleasant herbal teas of all to drink - and it makes you feel good!

Health benefits: Lemon Balm is a calming and cheering herb. it is gently sedative to the mind and body, helping you to relax and unwind, and if you are feeling low, it will help raise your spirits and encourage you 'to take heart'. Unsurprisingly therefore, it is good for palpitations and other symptoms that arise when one is under stress. Lemon Balm is in short, a 'balm' to make use of whenever life is becoming more than can be coped with.
As well as this emotionally calming effect Lemon Balm has a number of other important uses. It has constituents in it which are anti-viral, helping against cold sores and feverish conditions. It also soothes the digestion especially where digestive problems are caused by stress and emotional upset - take Lemon Balm regularly for indigestion and acidity.
Lastly, Lemon Balm's sedative action on the body and mind makes it a very useful night time drink. Slightly stronger than Chamomile, it is often all that is needed to help through a patch of disturbed sleep.

History and Folklore: Lemon Balm has always been thought of as a revivifying herb. 'The London Dispensary' (1996) says; "An essence of Balm given every morning will renew youth, strengthen the brain, relieve languishing nature and prevent baldness"! Lemon Balm flowers are loved by bees, and its Latin name Melissa comes from the Greek word for 'bee'.

CHAMOMILE

Part used as a tea: Flower heads - whole or crumbled.

How to make it: As a pleasant drink you can use a tea bag or a teaspoonful of the flower heads to a cup and make it in an open cup. However, for its medicinal virtues make Chamomile tea in a teapot or put a saucer on top of your cup while it brews. In this case use two teabags per cup, or a heaped teaspoonful of dried flowers. Allow to stand for 5-10 minutes.

How much to use: Use the quantities per cup as explained above, and take a maximum of 8 teabags, or 4 heaped teaspoons per day. Chamomile is very safe, has no known side effects, and is suitable as a herbal tea for young children.

Flavour and taste: Chamomile is not to everyone's taste, but if you have only ever have had a cup made from a single teabag it is worth trying a cup made from two teabags or a heaped teaspoonful of flower heads. This has a much more interesting apple flavour and is not insipid. To get the full flavour make sure you let the tea brew long enough.

Health benefits: Chamomile is known as 'Mother of the Gut' and it would be possible to write a whole book on its health benefits!
If you suffer from digestive weakness or any host of digestive problems - indigestion, heartburn, nausea, wind and so on - Chamomile may well be able to help/ Its sunny flower heads help relax the intestinal muscles so that griping and spasms such as colic are eased. They also gently stimulate the release of digestive juices so that you are ideal tea (ass honey if wanted) for young children and babies suffering from digestive problems. For breastfed babies, Mum should drink the tea and its benefits will be passed on through the milk.
Chamomile has anti-allergenic properties when it is brewed properly i.e. in a closed container. Brew up a strong cup and then inhale to help relieve hay fever symptoms and sneezing. Put it in a bath, or dab on as a lotion, for sore, angry or itchy skin. Use a warm but not hot for its soothing and calming effect helping to relieve to relieve bodily tension and encouraging a good nights sleep - especially in children.

History and Folklore: Women in ancient Rome took Chamomile to relieve period pains, and this is how it got its botanical name - Matricaria. Today there are better herbs for period pains e.g. Cramp Bark, but it can still be as effective as it was 2,000 years ago if taken as a strong tea.





Thursday, May 30, 2013

SUNTANNING

Please note: These are taken from a Vogue Natural Beauty Book from 1979 and I am in no way recommending that you go out in the sun without using suitable sun protection.

Coconut Oil: Use as it is - it will harden when cool, but melts very quickly in the sun.
Olive oil: Combine with an equal quantity of apple cider vinegar.
Sesame seeds: Grind a handful of seeds, add enough water to cover and a bit extra; beat until a milky lotion emerges; beat until a milky lotion emerges. Note* You may use tahini instead of grinding sesame seeds.
Sesame oil: The best natural protector there is, and it is the basis of many protective formulas.

Sesame Tanning Lotion
1/4 cocoa butter
1/4 cup of sesame oil
3/4 cup distilled water

In a double boiler, melt the cocoa butter; take off the heat and blend with sesame oil and water. Keep in refrigerator.

Citrus Tanning Oil
1/2 cup of sesame oil
8 drops of citronella or lemongrass

Put in bottle and shake well, this also gives protection against insect bites.

Tea Tanning Lotion
1 Tablespoon cocoa butter
4 Tablespoon sesame oil
4 Tablespoons of strong Indian tea.

Cocoa Butter Lotion
1/4 cup cocoa butter
1/4 almond oil
2 drops of verbena or lemongrass oil

First melt the cocoa butter in a double boiler together with the almond oil then remove from heat and stir in the verbena drops.


SUNBURN

To ease sunburn, if the skin is red and painful, try these anecdotes; 
equal parts of baking soda and water, patted on and eft for half an hour
a strong infusion of ordinary cold tea or sage tea
a pulp of mashed strawberries or cucumber, left on for half an hour
take a bath to which has been added a half a cup of bicarbonate of soda
splash burned areas with a diluted solution of cider vinegar and water
mix 1/4 cup of buttermilk (or yogurt) with 2 tablespoons rose water; splash on the skin
beat the white of an egg with 1 tablespoon of castor oil and smotth over the skin as alotion.

Anti-Sunburn Cream
1 egg white
1 teaspoon of honey
1/2 teaspoon witch hazel

Beat the egg white, blend in honey and then the witch hazel; smooth over sunburn. This must be kept in the refrigerator.


Sunburn Lotion
1 peeled cucumber
1/2 teaspoon of glycerine
1/2 teaspoon of rose water
1 teaspoon of wheatgrass powder

Extract the juice from the cucumber and mix with glycerine and rose water and wheatgrass powder.


Monday, March 11, 2013

Just Because It's Edible...

JUST BECAUSE a food is edible doesn't mean it's fit for human consumption. A large and still growing number of items that comprise a modern person's diet simply no longer fit into the orthodox classification of foods. The "non-foods" offer almost no nutritional value and many of them are harmful as well. Below is a list of 10 of these foods that are virtually excluded from an alkaline diet and the reasons why.

1. Coffee-Coffee produces a great deal of acid in the body, and high amounts of caffeine act as a stimulant. Coffee is of no food value. If you enjoy the taste of coffee, natural food stores carry a variety of delicious grain coffees that are caffeine-free.

2. Drugs- Including prescribed pills, paracetemol, asprin, birth control pills, etc. cause high acidity and if you want to stay balanced, they are not recommended.

3. Canned and processed foods-Almost all commercially prepared foods contain preservatives and additives, not to mention artificial coloring, artificial flavorings, chemical fillers etc. Most sugar coated breakfast foods are created in scientific laboratories by chemists; even synthetically enriched or fortified foods cannot successfully replace fresh foods, for the body cannot always absorb the chemical substitutes which were designed to imitate nature.

4. Dairy products-While some animal foods (fish, occasionally eggs or fowl) are included in a diet that encourages alkalinity, dairy products are almost completely eliminated. The cow's milk available today has been altered by pasteurization which destroys natural enzymes, leaving a poor quality food. All the other nutrients found in milk can be obtained in much higher proportion in foods such as seaweeds (which contain 3 to 14 times as much calcium) and leafy green vegetables. Milk by-products-butter, yogurt, cheeses and cream-contain saturated fats as well as dyes, artificial colouring and preservatives which interfere with digestion.
If you are strongly drawn to dairy products, goat's milk (or raw cow's milk from a trusted source) is preferred to regular supermarket.

5. Meat-Most meats today are filled with chemicals-residues from antibiotics, hormones, and tranquilizers that were shot into or fed to cattle, dyes added by man, and pesticides from foodstuffs consumed by the cattle. Processed meats contain numerous other non foods, eg. stabilizers, preservatives, fillers and artificial flavorings. Meat takes a long time to digest; it requires tremendous effort on the part of the digestive and circulatory systems to get rid of the toxins and poisons we consume when we eat flesh.

6. Refined oil, margarine and hydrogenated vegatable oils-Oil is very important in our cooking. When we eliminate saturated animal fats from our diet and replace them with quality vegetable oils, we must be careful in selecting oils that will supply us with nutrients and unsaturated fatty acids. All hydrogenated oils should be avoided since these are heavily altered, chemically treated products. The best quality oils of vegetable origin are available through natural health store. Choose oils that are unrefined, deep in colour and smell exactly like the plant they came from. The are full of impurities, but these "impurities" are actually vitamins-vitamins A, E, F and elements like natural lecithin.

7. Soft Drinks and diet colas-While the exact formula of coc-cola and dr pepper remain a secret to the world, it can easily be established through chemical analysis that colas contain caffeine, tannic acid, theobromine, glucose and sugar as well as substantial amounts of phosphoric acid and artificial flavouring agents, sweeteners and preservatives. If you have ever spilled a soft drink on fabric or furniture you are aware the damage it can do if left untreated-imagine what it does to your body!

8. Sugar-White sugar is not a whole food, merely an extraction from a plant. It is heavily processed. During the refining treatment, lime, phosphoric acid, and diatomaceous earth all come in contact with the cane or beet. The end product is pure-to the extent that everything possible has been removed.

9. Tap water-Everyone is aware that our natural resources have suffered through man's carelessness. Water is just one of the many essential foods that man has effected and misused to such an extent that good water is becoming scarce. Tap water is loaded with undesirable trace compounds, minerals and chemicals. Inexpensive and highly effective filters are recommended if you find it difficult to source a good spring water. If you are using spring water make sure you get it tested as spring water from rural areas are prone to contamination from farming. Contamination is not always detectable to the nose, taste buds or naked eye. Treating tap water may sound extreme to some but the difference to your health can quickly be observed in a few days. The hard compounds in water place an extra burden on the kidneys which have the job of filtering them out and often mineral deposits simply collect in the various organs. Hydro Fluoro Silicic Acid (H2SiF6), is a listed poison, and it is still being added to tap water in some countries. Also trace chemicals in water have a definite effect on food-bread made with tap water cannot rise naturally because the chemicals in the water actually inhibit or kill the natural yeasting agents.

10. GMO products- "The American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM)  reported that “Several animal studies indicate serious health risks associated with GM food,” including infertility, immune problems, accelerated aging, faulty insulin regulation, and changes in major organs and the gastrointestinal system." Institute for Responsible Technology

Eat the way nature intended you to! 





Wednesday, March 6, 2013

20 ways to look and feel beautiful


  1.  Eat healthy - this means eating whole grains and fresh fruit and vegetables. It also means staying away from processed foods and refined sugar. Drink a freshly made green smoothie every day. You can use nettles, spinach, kale, rocket, parsley, coriander, lambs lettuce, romaine lettuce, lollo rossa, wheatgrass, dandelion greens, mint, and fruits such as melon, banana, kiwi, pear, apple, orange, mango, grapes and strawberries. Use a balance of 60% fruit to 40% leafy greens. Use water and not milk or yogurt. Always drink immediately.
  2. Get lots of fresh air - this seems obvious but these days we forget to get fresh air. Going out in the car doesn't count.
  3. Drink fresh water whenever you are thirsty - some people believe that they should be drinking 2 liters of water per day. However there is also a belief held by macrobiotics that drinking water when we are not thirsty puts a strain on the kidneys by overworking them. They also believe that it 'dilutes' the person.  Drinking when thirsty and listening to your body is the best advice. However this works only when coupled with a healthy clean diet, that includes sea salt and excludes chemical table salt and processed foods.
  4. Drink white tea, roseroot tea and cistus tea daily - this will really boost those antioxidant levels as well as helping you to stay relaxed.
  5. Drink a glass of fresh water plus 2 tsp of apple cider vinegar each day - apple cider vinegar will flush out your system and help your skin to stay healthy and glowing.
  6. Eat plenty of good oily foods like fish, olives, avocados, nuts, seeds etc - these will help your skin to stay plump and moisturized from the inside. Forget slathering on moisturizer, you need to oil from within.
  7. Take a kelp supplement or eat sea weed every day - eating kelp is an ancient beauty secret. It helps your body to stay clear of built up toxins and will brighten your complexion. It is rich in minerals and vitamins that will help your skin to look and feel great.
  8. Take MSM and a natural Vitamin C such as Ester C - MSM and Vitamin C are needed for rejuvenation. Remember that.
  9. Drink alcohol only in moderation - Alcohol is ok in small doses but is toxic in large amounts. If you binge drink, your skin will soon pay the price. Preferably don't drink alcohol at all.
  10. Relax more - really should be number one beauty secret. Relaxing is one of the keys to wrinkle free skin.
  11. Meditate more - meditate on beautiful things. As within so without.
  12. Use clay masks - the best treatment you can do for your skin is to use a natural clay mask. Choose one that is right for your skin type.
  13. Use virgin coconut oil - forget everything else and use virgin coconut oil on the skin. It will be readily absorbed and will feed, nourish and moisturise. It is also good for firming, toning and reducing wrinkles.
  14. Don't expose the face to the sun for more than ten minutes a day - ten minutes is good, sans sun screen. This will allow enough time to absorb the healthy rays that will give you vitamin D and it is not long enough to do any damage. After ten minutes - cover up and not with sun screen, just wear a hat! Sun screen prevents us from absorbing the suns valuable rays and it is not recommended.
  15. Massage the face daily - using the fingertips massage the skin on the forehead, cheekbones, chin and jaw bone. Move the skin over the bones. This will stimulate circulation and make your skin look more alive.
  16. Think young - this is a big one - think young - stay young.
  17. Smile more - look in the mirror and notice what happens to your face when you smile. Now need I say more.
  18. See your dentist regularly - keep your teeth white and good.
  19. Be kind to others - this will help you to cultivate your inner beauty and it will show in your eyes.
  20. Last but not least love love love - this will make you feel and look beautiful. It's like a medicine for the body and mind. Give and be open to receive lots of it, it's guaranteed you will feel and look amazing.

Monday, March 4, 2013

Natural Health and Beauty - The Nutrition

Studies have shown that food children eat as babies can change the shape of the face, bone structure and skin and hair health. Stuff you think is genetic is not always.

Eating foods rich in sulphur and vital minerals and vitamins will ensure that your skin, hair, nails and teeth will be healthy and clear. If you eat foods that lack these vital nutrients you will look tired, dull, and feel awful.

So what sort of foods do we need to stay healthy and beautiful? What can we eat that will make our eyes sparkle, our hair shine and our skin glow?

These are super health & beauty foods so make sure to eat a few from every group every day.
Group 1
  • Fish liver oils, especially cod and shark.
  • Cantaloupe melon
  • pumpkin seeds
  • sweet potato
  • carrots
  • mango
  • spinach
  • turnip greens
  • apricots
  • kale
  • parsley
Group 2
  • collard greens
  • papaya juice
  • barley
  • oats
  • alfalfa
  • wheat germ
  • wholegrains
  • peas
  • asparagus
  • red clover (herbal tea)
  • brown bread
Group 3
  • salad greens
  • nuts
  • sesame seeds
  • molasses
  • bran
  • lentils
  • oats
  • wheatgrass
  • seaweeds
  • yogurt
Group 4
  • green leafy vegetables
  • almonds
  • avocados
  • fenugreek
  • rosehips
  • nettles
  • fish
  • brown rice
  • bananas
  • licorice
Group 5
  • sunflower seeds
  • chickpeas
  • peanuts
  • cabbage
  • broccoli
  • oranges
  • limes
  • lemons
  • kiwis
  • grapefruits
Group 6
  • black currants
  • strawberries
  • guava
  • papaya
  • mangoes
  • pineaple
  • green peppers
  • bean sprouts
  • apple cider vinegar
Group 7
  • dandelion greens
  • cayenne pepper
  • butter
  • vegetable oils
  • cauliflower
  • spinach
  • peppermint
  • oatstraw
  • bancha tea
Group 8
  • corn
  • burdock
  • horsetail
  • evening primrose oil
  • sage
  • milk thistle
  • brazil nuts
  • cashews
  • garlic
  • kelp
  • coconut
Group 9
  • mushrooms
  • black cohosh
  • hawthorn berries
  • peanut butter
  • onions
  • brussels sprouts
  • grapes
  • raisins
  • apricots
  • dandelion root
Group 10
  • carob
  • chocolate no sugar
  • chickweed
  • skullcap
  • beets
  • hops
  • raspberry leaf
  • flaxseed oil
  • borage oil
  • black currant seed
If you do this you will be supplying your body with all it's nutritional requirements.
Fats, protein, vitamins and minerals to stay healthy and beautiful.

Eating some foods from each of these groups everyday will provide you with a plentiful supply of: Vitamin A, Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, Niacinamide (Niacin), PABA, Inositol, Choline, Biotin, Folic Acid, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Zin, Selenium, Sulphur, Iron, Copper, Manganese, and EFA's

You need to get off your arse and get some daily exercise, the type that brings you out in the fresh air and get's you moving. Going out in the car doesn't count.